Category Archives: publishing

WENDY’S NEW BOOK IS OUT ONLINE

bad-boy2OK, kids, the new book is out! It is fiction, set in a bookstore (where did I get that idea) and based on a true incident. Jack came home from his prison visits one day with a napkin covered in drawings and figures. The prisoner he visited at Lee Penitentiary–a tunneler who had escaped several times– had drawn him a diagram of how to reinforce our bookstore basement. Jack felt this was safe because, “I didn’t tell him where we lived.”

I stared at Jack, “We’re the only bookstore for miles and I’ve never seen his face. What if someday he escapes again and comes here? He could pretend to be one of the Quaker prison visitors and I wouldn’t know if you weren’t here.”

Jack laughed, so that night I murdered him in this book. The rest, as they say, is history.

When you buy the book, you own the rights to sell it on. Seriously. You can put it on a platform of your choosing (Lisa Dailey, owner of Sidekick Press, can help but she’s a pro so value her time) and sell it from there. Or you can pass it on to a friend from your own download, but you cannot GIVE it away. The rules are simple: sell it for $4.95 if you sell it for money. You may also trade access to the book for a favor (someone going to the grocery store for you? Mowing your yard, dropping off meals?)

A lot of us have spare time right now and need something fun to read. Plus a lot of us have lost our jobs and need a little help. Lisa and I will be using 100% of the money paid for Bad Boy to help people in her native Seattle and my beloved Southwest Virginia. YOU can use the money for any good purpose – including keeping yourself afloat. Proceeds or barter, it’s yours to do with as you see fit. ENJOY

Purchase Bad Boy Here

Need a little enticement?

When Mary Ferguson’s beloved husband Henry dies, she quits her job at the college to run their bookstore and café in the tiny town of Bramwell, West Virginia. Resigning herself to the quiet life of a widow, Mary receives an email from an old friend of Henry’s–and something deep inside her catches fire. This friendly yet awkward and shy man says he was a fellow Quaker working alongside her husband, visiting lifers in prison whose families couldn’t or wouldn’t visit them.

He is still a good listener, and Mary soon feels alive again. Despite the dire warnings of everyone from her dog Ringo to the café’s cook Paige, Mary throws herself into a dark adventure that could have graced the bookshop’s “Romantic Fiction” shelves. Or was that “True Crime?” As her life plummets down a rabbit hole, Mary struggles to figure out what’s real, what’s imaginary, what’s literary, and what’s going to happen next.

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The Monday Book – Americans in Paris

Jack gets to do the Monday book review this week –

paris

Americans in Paris – Charles Glass

Some years ago I met up with a fellow Scot and close friend who was in the middle of a French adventure. We met in Vichy on Bastille Day and helped the locals celebrate into the wee small hours. The following day we took a train down through the Massif Central to Bordeaux, sharing our compartment with an elderly couple. As we passed through various small towns they pointed out walls where ‘resistantes’ had been shot, but also where immediately after the war ‘collaborateures’ had also been shot. Vichy, of course, was the Capital of the collaborating French government under Marshal Petain.

So Glass’s book which chronicles the experiences of a wide range of US citizens in the lead up to, and during world war two and who lived in Paris during that time was a fascinating read.

There are a number of intertwining stories throughout – The American Hospital, Shakespeare and Company bookstore and the political machinations of the Vichy government are the main ones. The hospital and the bookstore somehow managed to continue, even after the US declared war on Germany. They become important waystations for escaping British and American soldiers and airmen, and their directors took enormous risks.

The writing is engaging and based on well documented research.

I knew very little of the tensions within the Vichy regime or between it and the German government, far less the attitude of the US towards Petain and Laval and their rivalries. Glass’s book, therefor, filled in many gaps in my knowledge.

Although I found the many personal stories of individuals intriguing, I think it was reading them within the broader political and wartime context that really caught my attention.

I thoroughly recommend this to anyone with an interest in France, Paris or the politics of the period.

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Filed under book reviews, folklore and ethnography, Life reflections, publishing, reading, Uncategorized, Wendy Welch, what's on your bedside table, writing